LETTERS: Keep Latin studies, Socialism debate, Meriden taxes, Not my president

LETTERS: Keep Latin studies, Socialism debate, Meriden taxes, Not my president



Keep Latin alive and well

Editor:

I'm very saddened by the proposal to greatly reduce Latin studies at Strong and CRHS. I was always so proud of our outstanding language department at CRHS. My daughter (now a Spanish teacher in Mass.) took four years of Latin at CRHS and six years of Spanish (counting the two years at Strong).

There were many students who took more than one language during my teaching days at CRHS. The study of Latin along with Spanish and French also helped our students better understand English grammar.

We certainly aided the English department as we explained the differences between an indirect and a direct object, for example. For years now studies have shown the positive effects on a child's brain from language acquisition.

I know that many of our French, Spanish, and Latin students have made a career of teaching those languages they began at CRHS.

Let's not lose one of the stellar programs that might convince parents to consider CRHS as an excellent option for secondary studies

Marilyn Horn, Durham

Socialist security

Editor:

It’s time to take a good close serious look at the nine-letter four-letter word that seems to want to dominate our current political discourse — “SOCIALISM.”

It crops up continuously on Talk Radio, Fox News, Drudge, InfoWars, and even on the comparably respectable pages of this family newspaper. So far one writer on the Left has tried to explain it, and four on the Right have attempted to present it clothed in a diabolical costume complete with full red-horned, pointy-tailed and cloven-hooved regalia. One writer went so far as to yearn for the comparative “Good Old Days” of Venezuela under the brutal dictatorship of Generalissimo Marcos Perez-Jimenez (bananas, anyone?). Even the town of Wallingford sees it as an imminent threat, (I hope they’ve informed Mayor-for-life Dickinson, the 6-3 Conservative majority on its town council, and the Medicare-dependent hospital and public utilities that dominate its grand list.) 

Let’s look it in the face and see it for what it is — nothing more than a way of using democratic processes to make a capitalist economy benefit everyone who participates in it — producers, investors, employees and consumers alike. To make it fair, and thereby prosperous for all.

In a socialist country, like say, Denmark, (you know — ham, pastry, cheap butter cookies — that place), people own their own businesses, make their own products, provide their own services and hire their own employees. Government takes on the role of an overall manager, regulating wages, prices, and output quality while working to guarantee full employment.

Taxes are higher, but in return the Danes enjoy free health care and education, efficient transportation, and a guaranteed chance to succeed in life. Because of socialism, Denmark hasn’t fallen apart, but has risen to become the fastest-growing economy in Europe. Maybe it’s time for us to look at other examples.

Mike Reynolds, Meriden

Success with socialism

Editor:

I write in response to the letter by Tom Zagorski published on March 3. I don’t know where Mr. Zagorski gets his statistics, but he should find a more credible source. He writes, “Sixty years ago Venezuela was much wealthier than China or Japan. It was the 4th ranked world economy … In only 10 years Venezuela was destroyed by SOCIALISM.”  Venezuela was never even close to being the 4th ranked world economy. According to data from the World Bank, in 1960 there were at least 15 economies larger than Venezuela (in GDP), including both China and Japan. And World Bank data for 1960 does not include the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, where most countries had much higher GDPs than Venezuela. Brazil’s GDP was about double Venezuela’s in 1960 and Argentina’s was also certainly higher although the World Bank has no data for Argentina in 1960 either. Mexico’s GDP was larger than Venezuela’s and it practiced socialism: PEMEX, its oil company, was owned by the government. 

It is true that Japan had a lower GDP per capita than Venezuela in 1960, but it was just emerging from the defeat and destruction of World War II. By the mid-1970s, due largely to socialist policies, Japan was outcompeting the US at producing cars. China in 1960 also had a lower GDP per capita than Venezuela, but it was in the midst of the disastrous Great Leap Forward, which took it backward. It is now the second-largest economy in the world due to COMMUNIST economic policies! 

If you look at other countries that have experienced rapid development, such as South Korea or India, you find socialist policies. Socialism has proven superior to capitalism at developing the less developed countries.

John M. Talbot, Meriden

We’re living the nightmare

Editor:

"History is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake"  — James Joyce

Yes,we are living in that nightmare created by Lyin' Don, the most racist president since Woodrow Wilson. We all know that he was launched to his illegitimate status based on two racist themes, namely the anti Obama "Birtherism" claim and "the wall."

The genesis of "Birtherism" came from a Trump ally. “The wall" position originated from his friend Roger Stone in a speech delivered by Trump in New Hampshire in the winter of 2015.

This wall campaign is disturbing. Let's look at history. At the beginning of the 20th century Charles Davenport, father of the American Eugenics Movement along with Madison Grant, wrote many books and articles about the need to turn the U.S. into a nation populated only by “Nordic” Aryan type people who are basically Christians with blonde hair and blue eyes. He believed that immigration from countries populated by people who do not fit the Aryan model must be stopped.

Davenport stated that “we must build a wall to keep out the cheaper races.” Sound familiar?

It is interesting to note that in the 1920s a  madman while in prison read these books. It influenced him so much that he authored his own plans to achieve a pure race in a book entitled Mein Kampf. That man was Hitler.

Not my president!

Paul E. Gradwell, Meriden

 

Meriden taxes

Editor:

Lower taxes in Meriden next year? Doubt it. Just another Democrat scheme to get votes this November. If Democrats really cared about struggling taxpayers, taxes would be lowered this year.

Brian Welskopp, Meriden

Success with socialism

Editor:

I write in response to the letter by Tom Zagorski published on March 3. I don’t know where Mr. Zagorski gets his statistics, but he should find a more credible source. He writes, “Sixty years ago Venezuela was much wealthier than China or Japan. It was the 4th ranked world economy … In only 10 years Venezuela was destroyed by SOCIALISM”. 

Venezuela was never even close to being the 4th ranked world economy. According to data from the World Bank, in 1960 there were at least 15 economies larger than Venezuela (in GDP), including both China and Japan. And World Bank data for 1960 does not include the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, where most countries had much higher GDPs than Venezuela. Brazil’s GDP was about double Venezuela’s in 1960 and Argentina’s was also certainly higher although the World Bank has no data for Argentina in 1960 either. Mexico’s GDP was larger than Venezuela’s and it practiced socialism: PEMEX, its oil company, was owned by the government. 

It is true that Japan had a lower GDP per capita than Venezuela in 1960, but it was just emerging from the defeat and destruction of World War II. By the mid-1970s, due largely to socialist policies, Japan was outcompeting the US at producing cars. China in 1960 also had a lower GDP per capita than Venezuela, but it was in the midst of the disastrous Great Leap Forward, which took it backward. It is now the second-largest economy in the world due to COMMUNIST economic policies! 

If you look at other countries that have experienced rapid development, such as South Korea or India, you find socialist policies. Socialism has proven superior to capitalism at developing the less developed countries.

John M. Talbot, Meriden


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