LETTERS: Wallingford resident writes about Democrats and socialism

LETTERS: Wallingford resident writes about Democrats and socialism



Off the rails

Editor:

 I grew up in a family of mostly Democrats. My elders believed that the Democrats best represented working people, and at one time in our nation's history, that was true. Today however, the Democrat Party has gone off the rails. I am not sure what it stands for. I know the Dems hate President Trump, they believe in open borders, and they want to bring socialism to America.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who has been a congresswoman for about a month, has become the face of the Democrat Party. She is often a guest on CNN or MSNBC and has been featured on CBS “60 Minutes.” Ocasio-Cortez is a self-proclaimed socialist. In an interview, Anderson Cooper noted that some of Ocasio-Cortez's critics claimed that she wants to turn the United States into Venezuela, to which she answered, “of course not.” Why of course not? Socialism has failed countries throughout the world. Why couldn't it fail here? Do we live on magic land? In a recent poll, 74 percent of registered Democrats said they would vote for Ocasio-Cortez for president of the United States, if she were old enough to run. If that doesn't give you pause, it should.

Currently, there is another caravan, estimated at about 12,000 people, making its way north through Mexico toward the United States. These are mostly poor, desperate people from Central America, trying to escape the poverty and corruption of failed socialist states. They realize that America with its free people and free markets, still represents the “Gold Standard” as a place of opportunity for a better life. 

Here at home however, in what is truly a paradox for the ages, the Democrat Party seems hell bent on converting America to socialism.

George Stowell, Wallingford


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