EDITORIAL: The City Council’s wise approach to Meriden Markham Airport

EDITORIAL: The City Council’s wise approach to Meriden Markham Airport



With demand growing for hangar space for light aircraft in the Northeast, the Meriden City Council was wise to approve bonding $600,000 for a new hangar at Meriden Markham Airport, as recommended by the council's Finance Committee. This will be in addition to two new hangars approved by the council earlier this year.

With a waiting list of around 60 pilots looking to store their aircraft indoors at Meriden Markham, the new hangars are expected to pay for themselves through rental fees within the 20-year term of the bonds and then to continue generating revenue for the city for many years.

The city is also demolishing and replacing three existing hangars, which are upwards of 70 years old and are in poor condition. All told, these actions will also upgrade the appearance and function of the airport.

The new hangars will be built on the south end of the airport property, which extends over the Wallingford town line, under a building permit Meriden obtained from the town of Wallingford a few years back.

That building permit is set to expire "relatively soon," Finance Committee Chairman Brian Daniels said, giving officials a sense of urgency with the project. The building permit caps the number of planes that can be stored on the Wallingford side at 50. Daniels said the third new hangar will put the city around that limit.

The decision to build new hangars will not be good news to everyone, since some nearby residents are already bothered by the noise. Airport Director Wilma Petro encouraged one neighbor, who had urged the airport to enforce noise abatement regulations already in place, to file a complaint to the airport about any planes he feels are violating the noise abatement.

But the airport has been there for a long time — since 1928 — and it makes sense for Meriden to make the most of this municipal asset.


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