Hit-a-thon has kids come together, have fun and help Wallingford Little League

Hit-a-thon has kids come together, have fun and help Wallingford Little League



reporter photo

WALLINGFORD — Aspiring baseball players got to show off their swings on Sunday during the Wallingford Little League’s  Hit-A-Thon fundraiser.

“We wanted to try something that was more of an event to bring the league together,” said Amy Carroll, head auxiliary for Wallingford Little League.

Children raised money from friends and family prior to coming to Lyman Hall High School to see who had the best swing off a tee.

The batter who sent the ball the farthest in each of the five age divisions got a prize, while each kid who raised the most money for their division won a television.

The grand prize winner, for the most money raised overall, earned an Xbox One. The prizes were donated by local companies sponsoring the event.

Kristyn and Eric Lebarron said they were happy to help their son Aiden, 6, come in first in his bracket, knowing that the money will help take care of the fields and buy equipment for the league.

Being on the team reinforces some of the life lessons they teach him at home.

“It teaches them how to be a part of a team, how to win and how to lose,” said Kristyn Lebarron.

Chase Muttitt, 10, said he enjoys being a part of the league because it allows him to pitch, throw and hit to become a better overall player.

While they weren’t likely to meet their goal of $30,000 through this fundraiser alone, Carroll hopes that the kids who came out will have so much fun they’ll tell their friends to come next year.

Plus, it’s good to give them a chance to have a fun day with each other without the gameday stress.

“Game time is more serious,” she said. “This is just a time they can come together and have fun and help the league.”

dlyessian@record-journal.com
203-317-2317


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