Police: Man robbed Meriden bank after using fake 911 call as diversion

Police: Man robbed Meriden bank after using fake 911 call as diversion



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MERIDEN — A New Haven man faces charges after police said he robbed a Wells Fargo bank in April after calling in a fake 911 report of a shooting to distract police. 

Jose Cubiz, 41, of 821 Russell St., New Haven, was charged Thursday with first-degree robbery, third-degree larceny, falsely reporting an incident and misuse of the 911 system. 

On April 23 around 4 p.m., police received a 911 from a man saying that he heard two gunshots and saw a man drag a woman into a house on Buckingham Street. Police responded but did not find any evidence of the incident.

Around 4:15 p.m. the same day, police received a report of a robbery at Wells Fargo bank, 43 E. Main St. A teller told police a man handed her a note saying he wanted $2,000 and that he had a gun, according to Cubiz’s arrest warrant. The suspect left in a white van after receiving $2,000 in cash.

Police attempted to call the cellphone that made the 911 call shortly before the bank robbery, and got a voicemail for “Jose,” the warrant said. Police learned a white van was used in a robbery earlier that day in Hamden. Security images of the suspect appeared to match the Meriden incident, the warrant noted. 

Cubiz turned himself in to police May 2 in New Haven for an unrelated incident and told police he committed several robberies, including the Wells Fargo robbery in Meriden, the warrant said. Cubiz told police he made the 911 call to create a diversion for the robbery. The stolen money was not recovered, the report noted. 

Cubiz was arraigned in Meriden Superior Court on Thursday. The judge set bond at $200,000 and transferred the case to New Haven Superior Court for July 10. 

lsellew@record-journal.com
203-317-2225
Twitter: @LaurenSellewRJ


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